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11th US/ICOMOS International Symposium

11th US/ICOMOS INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

in cooperation with the National Geographic  Society

"Developing a comprehensive approach to US participation in the global heritage community"

May 28 - 31, 2008 in Washington, DC

Read the strategic plan and summary resoulutions from the 2008 symposium.

The 11th US/ICOMOS International Symposium will initiate a process for implementing the recommendations of the PreserveAmerica Summit’s “Participating in the Global Community” panel that will reinvigorate and enhance the U.S. role in international preservation. The Global Community panel made recommendations in four areas:  community building, stewardship, leadership, and capacity-building (more detailed recommendations for these four areas are outlined below).

The invited speakers will discuss a wide range of innovative, successful programs and partnerships involving collaboration in international preservation within these four broad areas as well as opportunities for international involvement. In addition to invited and selected papers to be presented at the symposium, US/ICOMOS is initiating a series of panel discussions amongst our members, each of which will result in draft recommendations, or action items, to be presented to the full symposium in Washington, DC.  The symposium will include break-out sessions for each panel that will allow conference attendees to discuss and finalize the draft recommendations into final reports that will be presented to the entire conference during the closing session.

Also, visit the PreserveAmerica website at http://www.preserveamerica.gov for more information on the PreserveAmerica Summit and the Global Participation panel report (pdf file).

Issue Areas for Panel Discussions

Paralleling the recommendations of the PreserveAmerica Summit’s “Participation in the Global Community” panel, the four panels for the US/ICOMOS Symposium are outlined below.

Community Building (Chair - Heather MacIntosh, Preservation Action)

§         Support a national effort to attract foreign tourism to cultural heritage destinations within the United States.

§         Facilitate the participation of US cities, historic districts, and cultural/natural landscapes in the World Heritage program through amendments to existing legislation [Preservation Act Amendments of 1980, provision 16 USC 470a-1(c)].

§         Allow replacement applications to the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List as sites are nominated and forwarded to UNESCO for World Heritage consideration.

§         Increase funding for and facilitate the participation of foreign professionals, academics, and policymakers in US preservation discourse and practice, and the participation of Americans in international discourse and practice, through NGO- or university-sponsored exchanges, government-sponsored tours and roundtables, etc.

§         Promote public awareness of and enhance education about the significance of historic cultural sites, landscapes, and shared heritage in nations’ histories and development by (a) engaging local school boards, and Federal and State education agencies, in making heritage education and awareness part of the curriculum; and (b) enhancing the World Heritage in Young Hands Program.

 Stewardship (Chair - Jonathan Poston, Clemson University)

§       Require Federal agencies and all government-sponsored undertakings abroad (including foreign aid, disaster planning and recovery, government-issued contracts, trade agreements, etc) to review and consider heritage concerns in their international operations. For example, establish a mechanism (forum, proposed legislation, etc.) to enhance the policies of USAID, the Department of State, and other Federal agencies to a) create conditions for local engagement, so as to incorporate relevant values and traditions, and b) assess the impact of their work on cultural landscapes, sites, and traditions.

§         Strengthen Department of Defense contingency planning and training to a) avoid, to the extent possible, destruction of cultural resources during periods of conflict and, b) incorporate heritage concerns in post-conflict reconstruction.

§       Raise awareness and promote the integration of heritage concerns as part of the private sector’s international activities, including relief and assistance endeavors, technology and academic exchanges, and corporate investments abroad; and encourage American business to support preservation (and its interpretation) here and abroad.  For example, require that portions of National Science Foundation grants for archaeological research overseas be used for conservation; encourage organizations involved in relief housing construction to incorporate traditional settlement patterns that rely on local building techniques and materials, etc.

§       Leverage and encourage international development organizations (such as the World  Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the Inter-American Development Bank, UNDP, and others) to embed heritage within their planning and development policies and frameworks.

Leadership (Chair, John Fowler, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, US/ICOMOS Chair)

§       Reestablish a US Government presence and bolster its role in inter-governmental organizations dealing with heritage.  For example:

­       Provide US Government support for the participation of US representatives in the governing bodies of ICCROM (International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property) and ICOM (International Council of Museums); Cultural Heritage Steering Committee (CDPAT) of the Council of Europe

­       Send official delegations to meetings of the Council of Europe, where the US holds a seat that is always empty.

­       Provide government support for the appointment of US representatives to offices and advisory committees of ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites);

­       Join the UN World Tourism Organization and provide leadership in promoting the tourism value of heritage preservation.

§        Increase funding and resources for Federal agencies and programs dealing with heritage issues abroad, such as the State Department’s Ambassador’s Fund, the NPS Office of International Affairs, etc.

§      Increase government support for American organizations addressing international heritage concerns, such as US/ICOMOS, AAM-ICOM, et al.

§         Ratify the 1954 Hague Convention and its two Protocols.

§        Strengthen the heritage preservation elements of US diplomacy, through the development of new initiatives and the enhancement of existing programs, such as the Ambassadors’ Fund and the International Visitors programs.

Capacity-Building (Chair - Kirk Cordell, National Center for Preservation Technology & Training)

§         Institute or enhance a forum or fora for sharing experiences and fostering an international dialogue about best practices among US agencies, organizations, institutions, and companies (public and private) engaged in preservation practices abroad, and their overseas partners (The Cooperative Conservation Conference might serve as a model).

§         Establish or enhance a network/clearinghouse (a) to gather and share data, information, and analysis; (b) to identify and coordinate gaps in knowledge and research; (c) to facilitate cooperative efforts; and (d) to assess international preservation practice effectiveness. (US/ICOMOS, the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training /NCPTT, and the Federal Preservation Institute might serve as conduits).

§         Expand support for existing programs that opportunities for international education, exchanges, and partnerships among public agencies, not-for-profits and NGOs, and private entities, such as Fulbright Fellowships, the US/ICOMOS exchange programs, ICCROM Fellowships, International Visitors programs, Ambassadors Fund, NPS twinning projects, and US-Italy exchange with USFS and NPS, technical and volunteer exchanges (USFS - Italy Heritage Excursions program).

Program Overview

CONFERENCE VENUE
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society
 

    17th and M Streets, NW (entrance on M Street)

    ACCESSIBLE BY METRO

    Farragut West Station (Blue, Orange lines)

    or

    Farragut North Station or Dupont Circle Station (Red line)

    

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28
Early arrivals, registration, and evening public lecture
   
Great Hall
National Building Museum

5:00 pm
    Registration and Welcome Reception at the National Building Museum
401 F Street, NW (Metro: Judiciary Square Station, Red line)

6:30 pm
    Public Lecture - National Building Museum
Mr. Omar  Sultan, Deputy Minister of Culture, Afghanistan
Co-hosted by the US/ICOMOS and the National Building Museum
in cooperation with the National Geographic  Society
401 F Street, NW (Metro: Judiciary Square Station, Red line)
$20 per Member registrant and students; $30 per non-Member registrant;
$35 all others

THURSDAY, MAY 29
Presentations and Evening Young Professionals Reception
8:00 am     Registration
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society     

Grosvenor Auditorium
National Geographic Society
9:00 am     OPENING SESSION
Welcome Remarks and Keynote Speaker
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society

John Nau, Chairman, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

Douglas Domenech, Acting Interior Deputy Assistant of Insular Affairs

Mary Bomar, Director, US National Park Service (invited)
10:00 am     Presentation of the First Annual Ann Webster Smith Award in International Heritage Achievement
10:15 am     Coffee Break
10:40 am     Christopher Koziol (USA) - "Toward a More Cosmopolitan Heritage: Non-Governmental, Transnational Initiatives as Evolving Reality"
11:00 am     Arlene Fleming (USA) - “Cultural Heritage and Infrastructure Development: U.S. Influence and Action”
11:20 am     Katri Lisitzin (Sweden) - "Sustaining a Knowledge Network for International Exchange on Cultural Landscapes"
11:40 am     Jim Charleton (USA) - World Heritage Advisor to the National Park Service, Office of International Affairs
12:00 noon     Lunch on your own
1:30 pm     Introduction of Session Chairs and Presentations: Programs, Opportunities, and Needs
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society
      Capacity-Building, Kirk Cordell (NCPTT), Chair
1:40 pm     Elizabeth Vines (Australia) - “Grass Roots Assistance for Small-Scale Conservation Projects in Asia” (presented by Kristal Buckley)
2:00 pm     Norma Barbacci (USA) - “Capacity Building Program for the Conservation, Management, and Sustainable Development of the Jesuit Guarani Missions of Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay"
      Community-Building, Heather MacIntosh (Preservation Action), Chair
2:20 pm     Eleanor Mahoney (USA) - "Building an International Movement: National Heritage Areas, the National Park Service, and Their International Partners"
2:40 pm     William Remsen (USA) - “The SAVE Program: USAID-Funded Cultural Heritage Conservation in Cyprus"
3:00 pm     Coffee Break     
      Stewardship, Jonathan Poston (Clemson University), Chair
3:20 pm     

Nur Akin (Turkey) - “On the Success of an Exchange Program: My Experience Related to the Fulbright Fellowship"
3:40 pm     

John Robbins (USA) - "A Road-tested Model:  The Richard Morris Hunt Fellowship"
4:00 pm     Questions and discussion
5:00 pm     Adjourn - dinner and evening on your own
6:00 pm
to
8:00 pm     Young Professionals Evening Mix & Mingle
Adirondack Room at Buffalo Billiards, 1330 19th St, NW (off Dupont Circle)

$15 per member registrant; $20 per non-member registrant; $25 all others
Light fare and cash bar available

Hosted by the US/ICOMOS International Exchange Program     

FRIDAY, MAY 30
Panel Breakout Sessions, Afternoon Field Tour

9:00 am
    Panel Discussion: US Participation in the Global Heritage Community
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society

John Fowler, Panel Chair

Rick Ruth, Director, Office of Policy and Evaluation, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; Director, Public Diplomacy Evaluation Office, Office of the Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

Kristal Buckley, ICOMOS Australia

Gustavo Araoz, Executive Director, USICOMOS, and Vice President, ICOMOS

10:15 am
    Coffee Break (Terrace)    

10:30 am
to
1:00 pm
 
    BREAKOUT SESSIONS (Charles Sumner School, 17th & M Streets)

Read about the Theme & Issue Areas for Discussion

    Leadership, John Fowler, Chair
    Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society

    Capacity Building, Kirk Cordell, Chair
    Sumner School (across the street from NGS)

    Community Building, Heather MacIntosh, Chair
    Sumner School (across the street from NGS)

    Stewardship, Jonathan Poston, Chair
    Sumner School (across the street from NGS)

Several rooms have been reserved for panel discussions/breakout sessions, each of which will hold 30-40 people.  Registrants may move between panels as they choose.  Attendees are encouraged to discuss their own experiences with international programs, partnerships, and initiatives. The Charles S. Sumner School is located at 1201 17th Street, (corner of 17th and M Streets) directly across the street from the National Geographic Society.
    

Charles Sumner School

2:00 pm
to
5:00 pm
    

Embassy Open House
in the Dupont Circle/Kaloramy/Embassy Row neighborhoods

The Public/Cultural Affairs offices of a number of Embassies have been invited to open their doors to guests of the US/ICOMOS International Symposium.  Maps will be provided.

Dinner and remainder of the evening on your own.
    

SATURDAY, MAY 31
US/ICOMOS Annual Meeting, Presentations, Panel Summaries

8:30 am
    The US/ICOMOS Annual Meeting is open to all US/ICOMOS members.
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society

US/ICOMOS members may take part in the US/ICOMOS Annual Meeting in the morning.  During the annual meeting, old and new business will be discussed, elections will be held for new members of the Board of Trustees, and the new Fellows will be introduced.

 
    Presentations Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society

9:30 am
    

Ning Wang (USA/China) - "The Status Quo and Outlook of the Collaboration between the US and China in Historic Preservation"

9:50 am
    

Soehardi Hartono (Indonesia) - “Historic Preservation as Economic and Development Tools: How U.S. Can Assist Indonesia”

10:10 am
    Kourosh Rashidi (Iran) - “The Conservation of Silk Road Caravansary Buildings in Iran”

10:30 am
    Coffee Break (Terrace)    

11:00 am
    

Burbuqe Bakija-Deva (Kosovo) - “The Reconstruction of Serbian Orthodox Site in Kosovo”

11:20 am
    

Barbara Little (USA) - “NPS/State Dept. Partnership for Afghan Heritage”

12:00 noon
    Lunch on your own    

1:30 pm

 
    Summary Presentations & Discussion of Theme and Issue Areas
Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic Society

Read about the Theme & Issue Areas for Discussion

    Leadership, John Fowler, Chair

    Capacity Building, Kirk Cordell, Chair

    Community Building, Heather MacIntosh, Chair

    Stewardship, Jonathan Poston, Chair

    

    Session chairs will summaries of the previous day's discussions and present a series of recommendations for programs, projects, partnerships, and initiatives for further action.  Ample time is allotted for additional discussion from the floor during this plenary session. The results of these presentations and discussions will be compiled in a post-conference report for distribution to policy makes, agencies, funders, and other interested parties.

3:30 pm
    Break    

3:45 pm
    

CLOSING REMARKS/WRAP-UP

Invitation to the 16th ICOMOS General Assembly in Quebec (Fall 2008)
by Francois LeBlanc, Acting President, ICOMOS Canada

Invitation to the 12th US/ICOMOS International Symposium
in New Orleans (Spring 2009), Jonathan Poston, Chair, US/ICOMOS Conference Committee

Adjournment
    

6:30 pm
to
8:30 pm     Closing Reception
Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the
US/ICOMOS International Exchange Program

Woodrow Wilson House Museum & Garden
(2340 S Street, NW, five blocks northwest of Dupont Circle)

$25  per member registrant; $35 per non-member registrant; $50 for all others

In recognition of the 25th anniversary of the US/ICOMOS International Exchange Program, we invite you to attend this reception honoring current and former US/ICOMOS Interns. Since the US/ICOMOS International Exchange Program was created in 1984, more than 600 young preservation professionals and over 70 countries have participated in this program.  The program promotes understanding of international preservation policies, methods and techniques and enables interns to make professional contacts and form personal friendships that will ensure a continuing dialogue between countries.
   
Woodrow Wilson House & Garden

The Woodrow Wilson House is a national historic landmark and house museum that focuses on President Woodrow Wilson's "Washington Years (1912-1924)". The last the home of President Woodrow Wilson, the property was given to the National Trust for Historic Preservation by Edith Bolling Wilson in 1961. The rich legacy of President Woodrow Wilson's vision and ideals is preserved at Woodrow Wilson House, and its collections provide an opportunity for all Americans and visitors to the only presidential museum in Washington, D.C. to reflect on his life as educator, president, world statesman and peacemaker. In 2005 the Woodrow Wilson House successfully completed an award winning $1 million interior and exterior restoration. Wilson House was a recognized by the White House Millennium Project as a designated Save America's Treasures

Public Lecture

The lecture is being presented in conjunction with the
11th US/ICOMOS International Symposium

and the opening of the major international exhibition

“Afghanistan: Hidden Treasure
 from the National Museum, Kabul”

at the National Gallery of Art in Washington
(opens May 25)


In 2005, Dr. Habiba Sarabi was appointed as governor of Bamyan Province of Afghanistan by President Hamid Karzai — the first woman to ever be a governor of any province in the country.  She previously served in President Karzai's government as Minister of Women's Affairs as well as Minister of Culture and Education.  As Governor, she has proposed a focus on tourism development as a source of income.

The “Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley,” inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2003, is perhaps best known for two monumental statues of Buddha that were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001.

TICKETS ARE REQUIRED FOR THE LECTURE:
Those attending the US/ICOMOS conference may reserve a seat for the lecture and attend a pre-lecture welcome reception by marking the appropriate boxes on the registration form (see link above).

Those who do not wish to attend the conference/welcome reception may contact the National Building Museum directly for tickets.  Visit their website at http://www.nbm.org at click on EVENTS (will be posted soon).

For more information:
“Fearless in the Face of Adversity” - The New Zealand Herald (March 7, 2008)
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/2/story.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10496136

“Afghanistan’s First Woman Governor” - BBC News article (June 9, 2005)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4610311.stm

 Bamyan Province Official Website - http://www.bamyan.info/

World Heritage Inscription: “Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley”
http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/208

National Gallery of Art exhibit press release: “Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul”
http://www.nga.gov/press/exh/273/index.shtm

Embassy of Afghanistan press release: “Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul”
http://www.embassyofafghanistan.org/02.19.2008HTOA.html

 National Geographic Society News (November 17, 2004): “’Lost” Treasures Revealed in Photos”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/11/1117_041117_afghan_treas...

Abstracts

2008 symposium abstracts are available in the document archive.

Speakers

Nur Akin (Turkey)
“On the Success of an Exchange Program: My Experience Related to the Fulbright Fellowship"

French High School Notre Dame de Sion (Istanbul, 1959-67); B.Arch. (Ankara, 1967-71); M.Arch. (Ankara Middle East Technical University, Department of Restoration/1972-74); Ph.D.(Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture, 1980); full-time professor until September 2007 at Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture, Department of Restoration and presently full-time professor at Istanbul Kultur University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture.  Her fields of expertise include conservation of historic towns and villages; restoration of historic buildings; traditional Anatolian cities and houses; 19th.century Istanbul; Ottoman period houses in the Balkans.  She is author  of several national and international articles (in French and in English) related to the restoration of historic buildings and urban conservation, as well as the author of two books (in Turkish):  Galata and Péra at the second half of the 19th century, Istanbul, Literatur Press, 1998 (1st ed.); 2002 (2nd ed).; Ottoman Period Houses in the Balkans, Istanbul, Litreratur Press, 2001, and Co-editor of a book (in English) 7 Centuries of Ottoman Architecture "A Supra-National Heritage, Istanbul, YEM Press, 1999.  She currently is a President of ICOMOS Turkey (2005-2008) and a Bureau member of the ICOMOS Historic Towns and Villages International Scientific Committee (CIVVIH).

Burbuqe Bakija-Deva (Kosovo)
“The Reconstruction of Serbian Orthodox Site in Kosovo”

Burbuqe Bakija-Deva is Head of the Cultural Heritage Department within the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sports of the Republic of Kosova.  Burbuqe is an Architect-Conservator. Her professional career began in 1990 in Gjakova as one of the founders of the Regional Institute for Protection of Cultural Monuments.  She has specialized in the “Cultural Heritage Maintenance Program” organized by the NGO “CHWB” – SIDA, Sweden.  In 2007 Burbuqe participated in a cultural heritage program organized by the US State Department where she had the opportunity to visit five states in the US and gained much experience in the field of cultural heritage.  Currently, she is attending a Master’s Course on Management of Cultural Tourism at the University for Business and Technology in Prishtina, under the auspices of UFI in Vienna- Austria. At present, she holds the following positions: (i) Kosovo Coordinator for the “Regional Program for Cultural and Natural Heritage in South-East Europe” of Council of Europe in Strasbourg; (ii) member of the Reconstruction Implementation Commission of Serbian Orthodox Sites in Kosovo (RIK); (iii) member of the tourism coordinating board;(iiii) member of the board  for the non-governmental organization KUSA (Kosava United State Alumni) and as Treasurer of the same; president of the board of “Elena Gjika” Primary school in Prishtina (1800students);  (iv) member of the working group on security matters of cultural objects; (v) member of the working group for subsidiary acts of the Law on Cultural Heritage.  Furthermore, she has recently finished her work as member of the governmental working group on redrafting the law on the Memorial of the late President of Kosova Dr. Ibrahim Rugova.

Norma Barbacci (USA)
“Capacity Building Program for the Conservation, Management, and Sustainable Development of the Jesuit Guarani Missions of Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay"

Norma Barbacci has been with the World Monuments Fund since 2001 as Director of Programs and Senior Project Manager.  She received a Bachelor of Architecture in 1983 from Carnegie Mellon University and a Master of Science in Historic Preservation with a concentration in Design in 1987 from Columbia University. With the WMF, Ms. Barbacci coordinates all Programs Department programs, projects, and key activities; she also manages a variety of field projects in Latin American and Spain.  Prior to the World Monuments Fund, she worked with Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and Planners, LLC as Senior Project Manager, Associate, and Studio Director.  There, she managed a variety of architectural, preservation, adaptive re-use and conservation projects.  Ms. Barbacci, a registered architect in New York, has given numerous presentations on a variety of preservation-related topics and activities.

Terry Childs (USA)
“NPS/State Dept. Partnership for Afghan Heritage”

Terry Childs, Ph.D., is an Archeologist with the Archeology Program of the National Park Service in Washington, DC.

Kirk Cordell (USA)
Chair: Capacity Building Panel

Kirk Cordell is Executive Director of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training in Natchitoches, Louisiana.

Arlene Fleming (USA)
“Cultural Heritage and Infrastructure Development: U.S. Influence and Action”

Arlene K. Fleming is a cultural resource specialist with masters’ degrees in archaeology/cultural history from Bryn Mawr College, and in communications from New York University.  For the past fifteen years, her work in developing and directing projects has focused on bringing new financial resources, technologies and approaches to the field of international cultural heritage conservation and management, within the context of social and economic development. At The World Bank, Ms. Fleming participated in the creation of a lending initiative for culture and development, which included work on projects in Turkey, Tunisia and Morocco, and serving as manager of a project in Eritrea.  In addition, her responsibilities included re-formulating the policy for safeguarding physical cultural resources in all Bank-financed development projects, and developing tools for implementing the policy.  Previously, Ms. Fleming participated in cultural heritage conservation projects sponsored by the World Monuments Fund, the Getty Conservation Institute, UNESCO, the U.S. Department of Defense, the Forest Service, the National Park Service and the Agency for International Development. In addition, she worked on projects for several United Nations agencies and the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment. Early in her career, Ms. Fleming served on the exhibit planning staff of the Smithsonian Institution and the New York State Museum. During the 1970s, as a senior staff member at the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities, she created and directed the agency’s evaluation program. In 1995, USAID commissioned her to write a report on: Addressing USAID Objectives through Cultural Heritage Conservation, illustrating the relationship of cultural heritage to economic growth, civil society and environmental protection.  Ms. Fleming is a former Treasurer and Board member of US/ICOMOS.

John Fowler (USA)
Chair: Leadership Panel

John Fowler is Chair of the US/ICOMOS Board of Trustees and Executive Director of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

Soehardi Hartono (Indonesia)
“Historic Preservation as Economic and Development Tools: How U.S. Can Assist Indonesia”

Soehardi Hartono (BSC Architectural Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, MSc Urban Design, University of Technology, Delft) is an architect by training with a special interest in heritage. He has worked in this capacity on a number of large scale projects in Indonesia and Malaysia. He currently is the director of the Sumatra Heritage Trust.  His affinity with heritage conservation stems from 1996 when he was involved in a heritage project for Braga historic street in Bandung. Ever since he has been involved with UNESCO heritage projects and workshops. He has presented papers on urban heritage in Asia at a number of international conferences. During his studies he spent several years in the Netherlands in which he earned his post-graduate diploma in Inner City Renewal and Cultural Heritage Management course at IHS. In addition to his activities for the Sumatra Heritage Trust Soehardi is also taking up assignments as a free-lance architect. He currently is a member of Indonesia ICOMOS and serves on the Executive Committee of Sumatra Heritage Trust.

Christopher Koziol (USA)
"Toward a More Cosmopolitan Heritage: Non-Governmental, Transnational Initiatives as Evolving Reality"

Christopher Koziol, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Colorado Denver.

Katri Lisitzin (Sweden)
"Sustaining a Knowledge Network for International Exchange on Cultural Landscapes"

Currently a Assistant Professor in the Department of Conservation, Gothenburg University, in Sweden, Ms. Lisitzin has extensive experience as an international cultural heritage expert on assisgnments with UNESCO World Heritage Centre, ICOMOS, and ICCROM.  For the WHC, she has conducted expert evaluation missions in Lithuania, Italy, Poland, Italy, France, and Spain.  For ICCROM, she served as a representative on working groups on Management Guidelines for World Heritage Cultural Landscapes (2001) and for World Heritage Europe Periodic Reporting and for Global Training Strategy Development (2004-2006).  She has numerous publications on international heritage issues to her credit.

Heather MacIntosh (USA)
Chair: Community Building Panel

Heather MacIntosh is Executive Director of Preservation Action in Washington, DC.

Eleanor Mahoney (USA)
"Building an International Movement: National Heritage Areas, the National Park Service, and Their International Partners"

Stephen Morris (USA)
"The Revised U.S. Tentative List for Nominations to the World Heritage List"

Stephen Morris is Chief, Office of International Affairs, National Park Service in Washington, DC.

Jonathan Poston (USA)
Chair: Stewardship Panel

Jonathan Poston is Professor of Historic Preservation at Clemson University/Charleston and former director of Preservation and Museum Services at the Historic Charleston Foundation.

Kourosh Rashidi (Iran)
“The Conservation of Silk Road Caravansary Buildings in Iran”

Born in in Iran, Mr. Rashidi commenced his education in the Conservation National Heritage field at university in Tehran in 1995, completing his studies in 2000. He presented my undergraduate dissertation ‘Restoration of the Shahrestanak Palace’ in April 2001, then served as Project Manager and on a full renovation and upgrade of the 100-room Mashad Hotel, (formerly the Semiramis Hotel) which dates from the early Pahlavi era in Tehran. Also in 2001, he was appointed Assistant Project Manager by the late Dr. B. A. Shirazi for the Conservation and Restoration work on the Massoudieh Palace complex in Tehran that dates from the Qajar period, being promoted to Project Manager in 2003, continuing in that capacity until 2005. He has worked with the Iran Chapter of ICOMOS sine 2001, as Assistant Administrative Manager to the President Dr. B. A. Shirazi and more recently the Internal Manager. My employment contract with Iran ICOMOS has been renewed every year since then and my current employment contract runs through.2008. He is presently on a leave of absence from ICOMOS Iran to attend a course of postgraduate study at Bamberg University in Germany. The course subject is entitled ‘The Conservation of National Heritage’ and following the completion of my studies.
William Remsen (USA)
“The SAVE Program: USAID-Funded Cultural Heritage Conservation in Cyprus"
 

John Robbins (USA)
"A Road-tested Model: The Richard Morris Hunt Fellowship"

John Robbins was the inaugural Richard Morris Hunt Fellow in 1990.  He is an architect and currently serves as deputy administrator at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.   

Dr. Habiba Sarabi, Governor, Bamyan Province, Afghanistan

In 2005, Dr. Habiba Sarabi was appointed as governor of Bamyan Province of Afghanistan by President Hamid Karzai — the first woman to ever be a governor of any province in the country.  She previously served in Karzai's government as Minister of Women's Affairs as well as Minister of Culture and Education.  As Governor, she has proposed a focus on tourism development as a source of income.

Elizabeth Vines (Australia)
“Grass Roots Assistance for Small-Scale Conservation Projects in Asia”

Elizabeth Vines, from Adelaide, Australia, is an award winning conservation architect, urban designer, author, and Adjunct Professor, Centre of Cultural Heritage in Asia & the Pacific, Deakin University, Melbourne.  She studied architecture at Melbourne University and Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.   She is a partner in the firm McDougall & Vines, an Adelaide based practice that has built up extensive experience and a record of achievement in conservation architecture and heritage town rejuvenation throughout Australia and Asia.  Elizabeth consults to a wide range of Government authorities and local councils throughout the region, and is a consultant to UNESCO and the World Bank.  She works on urban revitalisation programs for historic precincts and restoration projects on significant historic buildings.  She  is the author of Streetwise Asia - A Practical Guide for the Conservation and Revitalisation of Heritage Cities and Towns in Asia, (published by the World Bank, UNESCO and Deakin University, November 2005). She also wrote the Australian companion document Streetwise - A Practical Guide for the Revitalization of Commercial Heritage precincts and Traditional Main Streets in Australian Cities and Towns (1996).  She has undertaken many projects in Asia, including the award winning restoration of the Jewish Synagogue in Hong Kong. She has established the Streetwise Asia Fund for Heritage Conservation to provide small scale grants to worthy projects in Asia.  The first project is now underway on a Community Library in Champasak, Laos.

Ning Wang (USA/China)
"The Status Quo and Outlook of the Collaboration between the US and China in Historic Preservation"

Mr. Ning Wang is a graduate student enrolled in Historic Preservation program and Urban Design Program at the University of Pennsylvania. Ning Wang received his Master of Engineering degree in City Planning and Urban Design from Zhejiang University in China, and His BA in Architectural Design and Landscape Architecture from China Academy of Art. He was a university lecturer and taught Environmental design and History of Chinese and Western Architecture at Zhejiang Gongshang University in China. He was also involved in many design and planning projects and published many of his papers in China. He is interested in many fields, but now he devoted himself to preservation planning, and he shows his special interest in studying the relationship between economic development and historic Preservation in China and the US.