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2006 US/ICOMOS International Symposium

 

9th Annual US/ICOMOS International Symposium
April 19 - 23, 2006 in Newport , Rhode Island
 

From World Heritage to Your Heritage

The World Heritage List as a rich source of models for the protection and management of heritage sites with a particular focus on World Heritage cities

 
Hosted by the Newport World Heritage Committee
US Senator Lincoln Chafee, Honorary Chair
with local support from
 
BankNewport
Crystal Spring Water
Newport Restoration Foundation
Newport Vineyards
Preservation Society of Newport County
Prince Charitable Trusts
Roger Williams University
National Trust for Historic Preservation
Salve Regina University
Fleming Family Charitable Trust
 
 
and with Institutional Support from
Cultural Site Research and Management
Goody Clancy
Heritage Landscapes
Historic New Harmony
MB Dierickx Architectural Preservation
Robins Kaplan Miller & Ciresi
Robinson & Associates, Inc.
Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area
Wank Adams Slavin Associates LLP
White House Historical Association
World Monuments Fund
 
 
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
 
Wednesday, April 19
 
 
2 - 5 pm
 
Registration open at the Newport Marriott (conference hotel)
25 America's Cup Avenue.
Thursday, April 20 - Opening Session, Session 1
 
7:30 am Registration opens at the Newport Marriott (conference hotel)
"Newport Harbor"
Courtesy of the Newport Historical Society
 
8:30 am OPENING SESSION - Newport Marriott (conference hotel)
  WELCOMING REMARKS
John Fowler, Chairman of US/ICOMOS
The Honorable Lincoln Chafee, Senator from Rhode Island
Pieter Roos, Chair, Newport World Heritage Committee
 
10:15
mid-morning break
PANEL DISCUSSION:  WHERE IN THE WORLD IS U.S. HERITAGE
 
Francesco Bandarin, Director, UNESCO World Heritage Centre
 
Paul Hoffman, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and Parks and Head of the US Delegation to the World Heritage Committee
 
Denis Ricard, Secretary General of the Organization of World Heritage Cities
 
James Reap (USA), Chair, ICOMOS Legal, Financial, and Administrative Committee
 
Implementing the World Heritage Convention in the United States: Legislation and Regulation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1 - 2:30 pm LUNCH - provided for registrants in the Newport Marriott pavilion
2:30 pm
to
5:00 pm SESSION 1
Different perceptions of historic cities and sites and consequences on their protection and management
Session President: TBA
Session Rapporteur: TBA
 
 
Maria de las Nieves Arias Incolla (Argentina)
 
Historic Buenos Aires as a World Heritage Cultural Landscape
 
Luisa de Marco (Italy)
 
Which image(s) for Genoa as a World Heritage Site?
 
Dwan Kaoukji (USA)
 
An investigation of the social impact of heritage conservation on historic cities in Lebanon
 
Nupur Prothi-Khanna (India)
 
Cultural landscapes as World Heritage sites
 
 
 
 
 
6 - 8 pm Reception at Ochre Court, Salve Regina University - Buses depart from the Newport Marriott at 6 pm
$15 for registrants; $30 for spouse partner
Heavy hors d’oeuvres with a full and/or partial open bar
Note: registrants can attend both the Ochre Court and Rosecliff receptions for $25 ($50 for spouse/partner)
 
 
Ochre Court (1891) is a French Renaissance Revival style chateau by Richard Morris Hunt, the acknowledged dean of American architecture during the Gilded Age. Built for Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Goelet of New York, Ochre Court was one of the first of the opulent Beaux Arts palace in Newport. In 1945, Ogden Goelet offered the house as a site for the proposed headquarters for the United Nations prior to the selection of New York City as its home base. The Goelets donated the mansion in 1947 as the campus for Salve Regina College, now Salve Regina University.
 
 
Friday, April 21 - Field Tours, Specialized Committee Meetings
 
 
All tours
leave from
the Newport
Marriott
at 8:30 am
 
All field tours leave from the Newport Marriott Hotel at 8:30 am.  Space is limited so early registration is advised.
 
Please list tour preferences in order on the registration form; assignments will be made on a first-come, first-serve basis. Every effort will be made to give registrants their top-preference tour.
 
The field tours are included with registration ($25 additional for spouse/partner).
Please note that tours may involve a substantial amount of walking.
 
Click here for all FIELD TOUR DESCRIPTIONS or click on individual titles below.
 
 
Tours are scheduled to return to the Newport Marriott by 1 pm
in time for lunch on your own and the afternoon Specialized Committee Meetings
 
Tour 1: Colonial Newport - Newport in the 18th Century (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Tour 2: Newport in the Gilded Age - Newport in the 19th Century (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Tour 3: Salve Regina University: Managing the Future - Historic Buildings, & Adaptive Reuse (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Tour 4: Preserving Historic Landscapes: Blithewold, Green Animals, and Greenvale Vineyards (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Tour 5: The Breakers and Chateau Sur-Mer: Planning and Process for Major Restoration Projects (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Tour 6: Providence, Rhode Island: A City Preserved and Reinvented (Capacity: 50 people)
 
1 - 2 pm
 
Lunch on your own
2 - 5 pm
 
US/ICOMOS Specialized Committee Meetings
* Contact your Committee Chair for details.  Meeting locations will be announced at the conference.
 
6 - 8 pm
 
 
 
COCKTAIL RECEPTION AND US/ICOMOS INTERNATIONAL AUCTION
$15 for registrants; $30 for spouse partner
Heavy hors d’oeuvres with a full and/or partial open bar
Note: registrants can attend both the Ochre Court and Rosecliff receptions for $25 ($50 for spouse/partner)
Buses leave from the Newport Marriott Hotel at 6 pm
 
Rosecliff Mansion, 548 Bellevue Avenue
Rosecliff (1902) was the scene of the Gilded Age’s most extravagant parties. Built for Nevada silver heiress Theresa Fair Oelrichs, Rosecliff is modeled after the Grand Trianon at Versailles. The white glazed terra cotta villa was designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White. The house was donated by its last owners, Mr. and Mrs. J.Edgar Monroe, to the Preservation Society of Newport County in 1971. Scenes from several films have been shot on location at Rosecliff, including High Society, The Great Gatsby, and Amistad.
 
 
Rosecliff Mansion
(above and below)
 
 
The silent auction will include items representing both the host city of Newport and the international spirit of US/ICOMOS. Proceeds from the auction go to support US/ICOMOS programs and activities.
 
 
8 pm
 
Dinner on your own at one of Newport's many fine restaurants.
Saturday, April 22 - US/ICOMOS Annual Meeting, Sessions 2 and 3
 
8 - 9:30 am
 
The US/ICOMOS Annual Meeting is open to all US/ICOMOS members.
Location: Newport Marriott Hotel
US/ICOMOS members may take part in the US/ICOMOS Annual Meeting in the morning.  During the annual meeting, old and new business will be discussed, elections will be held for new members of the Board of Trustees, and the new Fellows will be introduced.
 
9:30 am
 
 
 
SESSION 2
Lessons from World Heritage cities and sites in creating broader sustainable development strategies
Session President: TBA
Session Rapporteur: TBA
 
10:15
mid-morning break
 
Victor Shmyrov (Russia)
 
Preserving the meaning of the gulag
 
Ashley De Vos (Sri Lanka)
 
The rehabilitation of the tsunami-devastated city of Galle
 
Annie Harris (USA)
 
Historic cities: the role of heritage and history in their preservation and economic vitality
 
Alberto Martorell (Spain/Peru)
 
Complexity of the Route of Santiago as a World Heritage site
 
 
 
 
 
1 - 2 pm
 
Lunch on your own
2 - 4:30 pm
 
SESSION 3
Examples of World Heritage sites in building public awareness and support
Session President: Kerstin Manz, UNESCO World Heritage Centre
Session Rapporteur: TBA
 
 
Kat Imhoff (USA)
 
The importance of place: viewshed protection at Monticello
 
Elena Molina (Peru)
 
The social appropriation of the heritage in the Historic Center of Lima
 
Ira Gorodskoy (Canada)
 
Landscape as palimpsest: the cultural landscapes and land patterns of the Russian Orthodox monasteries in the Holy Land
 
Aysil Yavuz (Turkey)
 
World Heritage sites: natural versus mise-en-scene
 
 
 
 
4:30 pm
to
5:30 pm
 
CLOSING PLENARY
Summary by the Rapporteur-General
 
Invitation to San Francisco, California, for the
10th US/ICOMOS International Symposium
 
Adjournment
 
 
FIELD TOURS
 
Tour 1
 
Return to
Program
Overview
 
Return to Registration
 
Colonial Newport:  Newport in the 18th Century (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Led by
Pieter Roos, Executive Director, Newport Restoration Foundation
Jessica Files, Director of Education, Newport Historical Society
Michael Balaban, Executive Director, Touro Synagogue Foundation
Cheryl Helms, Executive Director, Redwood Library
Lisa Dady, Director of Education, Newport Restoration Foundation
Discover the remarkable story of early Newport on a stroll through the exquisitely preserved Historic Hill and Point neighborhoods.  Hear stories of revolution and ruin, struggles for religious liberty, and the brilliant (though sometimes infamous) entrepreneurship of the city’s diverse residents.
 
The tour covers several significant landmarks from the heyday of this “lively experiment” of a colony, and includes in-depth looks inside potential World Heritage sites such as the Great Friends Meeting House (1699), The Colony House (1736-1739), Touro Synagogue (America's Oldest Synagogue, 1763), and The Redwood Library (founded 1747).
 
 
Old Colony House
Courtesy of the
Newport Historical Society
 
 
Great Friends Meeting House
Courtesy of the
Newport Historical Society
 
Tour 2
 
Return to
Program
Overview
 
Return to Registration
 
Newport in the Gilded Age - Newport in the 19th Century (Capacity: 50 people)
 
Led by
John Tschirch, Architectural Historian, Preservation Society of Newport County, Charles J. Moore, Director of Conservation, Preservation Society of Newport County
Philip Marshall, Roger Williams University
 
Join us for a visit to what was once a veritable laboratory of architectural experimentation.  During the nineteenth century, picturesque summer cottages sprang up in variety of styles along Newport’s Bellevue Avenue. This tour provides an opportunity to see three landmark properties of varied style that chronicle the major design movements of the era.  The tour will first visit Kingscote, a Gothic Revival style villa finished in 1841 by architect Richard Upjohn.  Next, the Isaac Bell House completed by Stanford White in 1883, which is a fine example of the American Shingle style.  Lastly, The Elms, completed in 1901 by architect Horace Trumbauer. The Elms is largely modeled after a grand 18th century French Château, the Château d’Asnieres, which is located just outside of Paris.  These three properties are owned and operated by The Preservation Society of Newport County.
 
 
Kingscote
 
 
The Elms
 
Tour 3
 
Salve Regina University: Managing the Future - Historic Buildings, & Adaptive Reuse (Capacity: 50 people)
Return to
Program
Overview
 
Return to Registration
 
Led by
James Garman, Salve Regina University
The Salve Regina University campus includes over 20 historic structures in the Ochre Point and Bellevue Avenue Historic Districts. The oceanside buildings and landscapes on Salve Regina's 75-acre campus make it one of the loveliest in the country. Bordering the famed Cliff Walk, the setting exemplifies significant developments in the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of 19th and early 20th century America. The university continues to act as a steward of this heritage and is actively engaged in preserving the splendor of its Gilded Age properties, while also adapting them for educational use.
 
Funded by a grant by the Getty Foundation, the University has created a Campus Heritage Preservation Plan which addressed issues of both historic preservation and the needs of an academic institution. Tours of Ochre Court (1891) and the Wetmore Stables (c 1880) will explore both preservation and adaptive reuse on the campus.
 
 
Ochre Court
 
 
Wetmore Stables
 
Tour 4
 
Preserving Historic Landscapes: Blithewold, Green Animals, and Greenvale Vineyards (Capacity: 50 people)
Return to
Program
Overview
 
Return to Registration
 
Led by
James Donahue, Horticulturist, Preservation Society of Newport County
Julia L. Morris, Director of Horticulture, Blithewold Gardens and Arboretum
Marion Murray, Director of Education, Blithewold Gardens and Arboretum
Nancy Wilson, Owner, Greenvale Vineyards
This tour provides an opportunity to visit three unique landscape sites in the area surrounding historic Newport. Blithewold is one of New England’s premier estate gardens. Thirty three, landscaped acres overlook Bristol Harbor and Narragansett Bay and feature an extensive and unique collection of trees and shrubs, mostly exotic to the Rhode Island landscape. While the grounds were laid out in 1897, the current mansion was built in 1907 after a fire destroyed the original house.
 
Green Animals, a small, country estate in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, is the northernmost topiary garden in the United States and has been cared for by The Preservation Society of Newport County since 1972.  Over the course of the twentieth century, the grounds were transformed into a whimsical, estate garden featuring eighty pieces of topiary including, animals, birds, geometric shapes and extensive seasonal plantings.
 
Greenvale Vineyards (1864-65), only a short distance away from Green Animals in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, is located on Greenvale Farm, which is listed on both the Rhode Island and the National Register of Historic Places. This Victorian, summer farmstead is now home to an award-winning winery.
 
 
Blithewold
 
 
Green Animal
 
Tour 5
 
The Breakers and Chateau-sur-Mer: Planning and Process for Major Restoration Projects (Capacity: 50 people)
Return to
Program
Overview
 
Return to Registration
 
Led by
Carl Rothbart, Associate Director of Preservation, WASA Architects and Engineers
The architects responsible for the exterior restoration of both The Breakers and Chateau-sur-Mer will discuss the process of researching and designing the historically appropriate repair work for these two Newport architectural icons. The recently completed exterior restoration and tile roof replacement at The Breakers and the in-process exterior restoration and slate Mansard roofing and decorative metalwork restoration at Chateau-sur-Mer will be reviewed on site and in detail.  The architects will discuss the decision-making process, including historic research, non-invasive testing, and hands-on inspections involved in designing and planning for these historically significant and highly visible projects.
 
Visit these links for WASA's descriptions of their work at 
The Breakers and Chateau-sur-Mer (Note: PDF files)
 
 
The Breakers
 
 
Chateau-sur-Mer
 
Tour 6
 
Providence, Rhode Island: A City Preserved and Reinvented (Capacity: 50 people)
Return to
Program
Overview
 
Return to Registration
 
Led by
Providence Preservation Society
The city of Providence is a model of urban revitalization. Once the core of a business district, the Westminster Street neighborhood is now the center of a vibrant arts district with former commercial buildings in the process of conversion to residential lofts. The Broadway and Armory Districts of the city is another example of preservation by owner initiative through the support of the Revolving Fund of the Providence Preservation Society. Displaying a rich collection of 19th and early 20th century houses, the Broadway and Armory neighborhoods are important examples of how historic Providence has been reinvented through preservation efforts.
 
This year, the Providence Preservation Society marks its 50th anniversary, honoring the visionary work of its founders and celebrating its relevance in the city today. Formed in 1956 to stop the further demolition of colonial-period houses on College Hill, PPS has grown from a small grassroots network to its current leadership role as a citywide preservation, advocacy and education organization.